Sky at Night - markhumpage
Gemenids Meteor Shower 13/14th Dec 2013. This single composite image was captured with the Olympus E-M1 & 12mm lens over a period of 4-5 hrs. It shows numerous gemenid meteors shooting across the Eastern sky between approx midnight on 13th to 4/5am on 14th.

How did I capture this? With camera & lens on tripod I set in manual mode and infinity focusing, ISO 320, F2.0, 10s exposure. Using the remote cable (set to lock) this forced the camera to take continuous exposures until the battery died (4-5hrs).  I then transferred the 2000 or so images to MAC and inspected each image identifying those which had captured individual meteors. I then imported all the meteor images into editing software (Pixelmator) and stacked each image on top of each other. I chose a foreground image (trees lit up) as the main image. I then selected each meteor image and highlighted the meteor, inversed the image and cut. This retained the exact location of each meteor and removed all the stars. Otherwise the stacked composite would have shown repeated stars for each meteor (which makes for a messy image). Once all the meteors were added the final image was flattened as the composite you see. This is a b&w version.

Gemenids Meteor Shower 13/14th Dec 2013. This single composite image was captured with the Olympus E-M1 & 12mm lens over a period of 4-5 hrs. It shows numerous gemenid meteors shooting across the Eastern sky between approx midnight on 13th to 4/5am on 14th.

How did I capture this? With camera & lens on tripod I set in manual mode and infinity focusing, ISO 320, F2.0, 10s exposure. Using the remote cable (set to lock) this forced the camera to take continuous exposures until the battery died (4-5hrs). I then transferred the 2000 or so images to MAC and inspected each image identifying those which had captured individual meteors. I then imported all the meteor images into editing software (Pixelmator) and stacked each image on top of each other. I chose a foreground image (trees lit up) as the main image. I then selected each meteor image and highlighted the meteor, inversed the image and cut. This retained the exact location of each meteor and removed all the stars. Otherwise the stacked composite would have shown repeated stars for each meteor (which makes for a messy image). Once all the meteors were added the final image was flattened as the composite you see. This is a b&w version.

Gemenidsmeteorsstarsastronomynight skyplanetslow lightmeteor watcholympusEM1