Sky at Night - markhumpage
Another historic capture. My first star trail opportunity with the Olympus E5. Monday 15 Nov 2010 was a cold clear night. I mounted the E5 on a tripod with the 7-14mm lens at the bottom of my field and composed around my house and more importantly Polaris (around which the trail spins). I set the IS0 to 640 opened the aperture as wide as it went (F4) and shot 15s exposures continuously all night from approx 7pm to 7am the next morning. Noise reduction was switched OFF. Camera was powered via external using extension lead from garage. To prevent the camera and lens from dewing and freezing over my home made dew shield was used. The following morning I retrieved the camera from a very misty and frozen field. After downloading the 2500 images and running through stacking software the final composite, that you see, was produced. It is worth explaining that the cloud cover moved through during the night which results in the final orange/red colours (light pollution). It adds to the effect and also helped drown out the plethora of image polluting airplane trails, a few of which are still clearly visible.

The most important thing to me was the distinct lack of noise within the image, when compared to similar shots I have taken with the E3. I rarely pushed the E3 beyond ISO 320 for shots like this because of noise. The E5 on ISO 620 produces a much cleaner, noise-less image. There is definite improvement in the noise department from the new E5 sensor and its processing engine. This is very pleasing indeed to me. I would also add that this image had very little post processing. It was imported into Aperture with a tiny levels adjustment. NO noise reduction filter was applied and reduced from the original JPEG size to this one you see with No sharpening.

Another historic capture. My first star trail opportunity with the Olympus E5. Monday 15 Nov 2010 was a cold clear night. I mounted the E5 on a tripod with the 7-14mm lens at the bottom of my field and composed around my house and more importantly Polaris (around which the trail spins). I set the IS0 to 640 opened the aperture as wide as it went (F4) and shot 15s exposures continuously all night from approx 7pm to 7am the next morning. Noise reduction was switched OFF. Camera was powered via external using extension lead from garage. To prevent the camera and lens from dewing and freezing over my home made dew shield was used. The following morning I retrieved the camera from a very misty and frozen field. After downloading the 2500 images and running through stacking software the final composite, that you see, was produced. It is worth explaining that the cloud cover moved through during the night which results in the final orange/red colours (light pollution). It adds to the effect and also helped drown out the plethora of image polluting airplane trails, a few of which are still clearly visible.

The most important thing to me was the distinct lack of noise within the image, when compared to similar shots I have taken with the E3. I rarely pushed the E3 beyond ISO 320 for shots like this because of noise. The E5 on ISO 620 produces a much cleaner, noise-less image. There is definite improvement in the noise department from the new E5 sensor and its processing engine. This is very pleasing indeed to me. I would also add that this image had very little post processing. It was imported into Aperture with a tiny levels adjustment. NO noise reduction filter was applied and reduced from the original JPEG size to this one you see with No sharpening.

Star trailstarsnight skyplanetsastronomypolarisOlympusE5Mark Humpage